The Lord is My Shepherd and Boy Do I Need a Good Shepherd

There’s a Good Reason Why We’re Compared to Sheep in the Bible

Isn’t it interesting how once a subject shows up, it continues showing up everywhere? The similarities of people being like lost sheep is one such case.

Pastor Lee’s sermon this week was about the importance of a shepherd to the sheep. Without a fence or a shepherd sheep wander off and get lost. I’ve written about this over the past few weeks, i.e., my cousin Keith’s sermon about laughing with the sheep and I touched on this in last week’s post about curiosity.

We are easily led astray, just like a flock of sheep following the wrong things. It’s easier to just follow rather than lead. The problem is that there are wolves everywhere. We’re told to be “shrewd like snakes and harmless as doves” Matthew 10:16 while we’re among the wolves.

There’s a good reason we’re so often compared to sheep in the Bible. Because we act like them…we need a Shepherd! Our “sheepness” is an issue of blindly following the wrong things.

Think things through before blindly following.

There are thousands of people reported missing every day. Many of these cases are resolved within a few days, but there are several that never are. These include kids running away from home, mental health issues or people who choose to be detached from society.

Ultimately in most of the cases the problem is a lack of a Good Shepherd. Jesus is constantly looking for these “lost sheep”. He will leave the 99 sheep that are safe to go look for the 1 that is missing. Mathew 18:22

As we discussed the sermon in Sunday School we talked about the differences of goats and sheep. How sheep are often considered dumber. How goats are more curious than sheep. Upon researching the difference between sheep and goats I found some things that make the Biblical comparisons very fitting.


…Sheep have a reputation for being stupid and just sort of worthless. The sheep of today are much different than sheep as they were created, they have been bred in such a way as to produce fluffier, dumber sheep. But they are, and have always been, dependent on their shepherd. Goats, on the other hand, have a reputation for being independent, opinionated and curious at best—or vulgar, dangerous and destructive at worst.

Shepherds protect sheep from their environment, whereas goatherds protect the environment from their goats. So for us to be God’s sheep, we must depend on Him to defend us. If we push, take, destroy and bully, we are goats.

Sheep follow the voice of their shepherd and trust him to lead them to food, water and safety. If they wander, which some do, the shepherd will go out and rescue them and bring them back to the safety of the flock.

A goat, however, doesn’t follow anyone. A herd of goats goes where it wants, and the goatherd follows behind. Instead of grazing, goats “browse”—foraging for whatever strikes their fancy. So that tells us that if we are allowing ourselves to be led, being sensitive to the pull of God’s Spirit, and following the path of our Shepherd, we are sheep.

If we are headstrong, going our own way, and pulling back against God’s Spirit, we are goats.


Follow the Good Shepherd and don’t be a goat.

You Don’t Have to Be Lost

 

 

 

 

 

How to Avoid Ending Up as Unclaimed Baggage

 

 

We’ve all experienced times when we felt lost, wondering what to do, unsure of a decision. We don’t have to stumble around in the dark, bumping into things.


There is an Unclaimed Baggage Center in Alabama where an average of 7,000 unclaimed airline items go every day. It amazes me that much luggage is unclaimed or lost. I understand things get lost, but if it was my luggage, you can be sure that I would be looking long and hard.


Most of us are familiar with the stories Jesus tells about the lost sheep and coin in Luke 15:1-10. Both tell about the importance of being found, the importance of finding, and the joy when the lost are found. We are one or the other, either the lost or the ones seeking the lost. God is looking for the lost and can use help.

 

Everyone can be found.


Many people choose not to be found; they prefer the darkness. Less is required of us if we’re unseen, in the shadows. Life is easier with the light turned off.


Hank Williams wrote the famous song “I Saw the Light” 1948. “Williams often sang his song as if he was a man facing the end, desperate to believe in a salvation that he didn’t think existed. Was he trying to convince himself of the reality of the Gospel?


He sang: “I wandered so aimless, life filled with sin; I wouldn’t ask my dear Savior in. Then Jesus came like a stranger in the night; Praise the Lord, I saw the light!” The chorus went, “I saw the light, I saw the light. No more darkness; no more night. Now I’m so happy no sorrow in sight. Praise the Lord, I saw the light!”


Near the end of his life he was doing a show in San Diego but stumbled drunk off stage after only two songs. His friend, country performer Minnie Pearl tried to sober him as they rode around town in the back seat of his Cadillac so he could do his second show. She got him to join her in singing “I Saw the Light” thinking it might help sober him, but after one verse, Hank put his head in his hands and said, “O Minnie, Minnie, I don’t see no light. There ain’t no light.”


“But there was light, only it seems Hank refused it.”


Don’t spend your life in a pile of unclaimed baggage in some dark corner somewhere.

 

Turn on the light.


If you can’t find the switch or don’t know how to turn it on, ask for help. There is someone out there who can help you.